There were 291 800 new mobile malware programmes in Q2

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Malware creators are becoming craftier by the year and more of their threats are being released into the wild. This naturally poses a problem for anybody who doesn’t have decent protection.

To drive the message home on just how important it is to have mobile and PC malware protection, Kaspersky Lab revealed that 291 800 new mobile malware programmes emerged only during the second quarter of the year.

Even more worrying, this number signifies an overall increase of more than double the amount of malware released over the previous quarter, and 1 million mobile malware installation packages in the same quarter – which is seven times more than Q1.

We’ll just let that sink in…

In the first quarter Kaspersky Lab’s report said that the malware file Trojan-SMS.AndroidOS.OpFake.cc could infect 29 banking and financial applications. The creators in the second quarter got craftier and adapted it so that it can attack 114 banking and financial applications.

In terms of web-borne attacks, it seems that just over half of the attacks block by Kaspersky Lab software stemmed from Russia. The rest of the top ten list of original countries for attacks are the USA, the Netherlands, Germany, France, Virgin Islands, Ukraine, Singapore, the UK and China.

But it is not all bad news.

“There were 5.9 million notifications about attempted malware infections to steal money via online access to bank accounts – this is 800 000 lower than in Q1,” Kaspersky Lab said.

While it still happens, it also seems like cyber criminals are launching more attacks on small to medium companies, most likely because they tend to have a smaller budget for protecting themselves online.

The most used piece of malware for attacks them was a cyberespionage campaign called Grabit.

“If security measures are not planned at the development stage, that could have serious implications later, and retro-fitting security might not be a straightforward task,” comments Alexander Gostev, Chief Security Exert at Kaspersky Lab’s Global Research and Analysis Team.

[Image – CC by 2.0/Matthieu Aubry]

Charlie Fripp

Charlie Fripp

Charlie started his professional life as a motoring journalist for a community newspaper in Mpumalanga, Charlie explored different journalistic angles since his entry into the fast-paced world of publishing in 2006. While fostering a passion for the arts, Charlie developed a love for technology – both which allowed him to serve as Entertainment and Technology Editor for an online publication. Charlie has since been heavily involved in consumer technology for various websites and publications. He thoroughly enjoys World War II films and cerebral documentaries; aviation; photography and indie music. Oh yes, and he also has a rather strange obsession with collecting coffee mugs from his travels.

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