Hotfix 1.12 shores up save file vulnerability in Cyberpunk 2077

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Fixing Cyberpunk 2077 continues to be a one step forward, one step back process, as today hotfix 1.12 has been released which aims to correct an exploit using game save files.

The full hotfix patch notes are below, short as they are:

This update addresses the vulnerability that could be used as part of remote code execution (including save files):

  • Fixed a buffer overrun issue.
  • Removed/replaced non-ASLR DLLs.

Eurogamer obtained comment from CD Projekt Red in regards to this issue before the hotfix. Apparently use of mods or external save files could lead to remote code execution by third parties. It’s a very cyberpunk problem, but players having their PC run potentially harmful code isn’t a very good look.

CD Projekt Red advised players earlier this week to avoid mods and custom saves from outside sources until the problem could be fixed, which is apparently what hotfix 1.12 does.

If this all seems a bit like déjà vu it’s because the previous hotfix – 1.11 – was also issued to deal with a problem created from the larger patch 1.1.

This may seem like nitpicking if you haven’t been following the sordid story of Cyberpunk 2077. Hotfixes are supposed to fix problems like this, right? Well yes, but as we covered in our launch review of the game, Cyberpunk 2077 is drowning in other problems excluding the ones covered by these patches and hotfixes.

We understand CD Projekt Red can’t deal with everything simultaneously, but the work on this game right now feels like that classic cartoon skit: plug a leaking hole with one finger only for more holes to pop up elsewhere.

All of this is against the backdrop of the biggest problem: Cyberpunk 2077 is an unfinished game with oodles of cut content. Even if the game ran flawlessly in terms of stable framerates and no glitches, it still isn’t the product that was marketed to us before launch.

Clinton Matos

Clinton Matos

Clinton has been a programmer, engineering student, project manager, asset controller and even a farrier. Now he handles the maker side of htxt.africa.

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