Map Monday: The deadliest countries for journalists to work

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For most journalists, their daily job is fairly normal, with most of any excitement and adrenaline coming from breaking stories.

But for some, chasing a story can turn into a life or death situation.

In 2016, 76 journalists were killed while they were carrying out various assignments in some of the most hostile territories on the planet, with one journalist being killed so far this year, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ).

CPJ is a non-profit organisation which promotes press freedom worldwide. It has been collecting data of attacks on journalists and media workers (including camera people and other support staff) that have resulted in death since 1992.

Since that period, 2009 saw the highest number of deaths, with 101 journalists and media workers being killed (the data excludes deaths as a result of accidents, illness and suicide).

South Africa has seen four journalists killed since 1992. Three were killed in 1993 and 1994, a period where the country was almost plunged in civil war due to political conflict mainly between rival parties the ANC and IFP.

Ken Oosterbroek, a member of the famous “Bang Bang Club, Abdul Shariff and Calvin Thusago, were all killed in the East Rand, the hotbed of political violence during the time.

One freelance photographer was killed in 2014 allegedly by police while capturing a public service delivery protest.

Last year’s stats show that Syria, Yemen and Irag were the most dangerous countries for journalists last year, after recording the top three highest number of killings respectively.

Three African countries; Libya, Somalia and Guinea were among the top 14 countries recording the most killings.

 

Journalists covering war accounted for the beat with the highest number of deaths (75%). Camera operators (33%), photographers (33%) and online reporters (29%) were the top three most killed.

Crossfire and combat accounted for the top cause of death (56%) followed by murder (38%).

 

Not one person has been arrested or convicted for any of the deaths caused last year. And while for the most part, the motives behind the killings are confirmed, a significant portion are not confirmed.

See all the stats on CPJ’s wbsite.

[Image – Global Panorama]

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