Spotify is making it easier to enjoy your favourites

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For anybody like us, who has close on 3 000 Liked songs on their Spotify account, today’s announcement should make it a bit easier to enjoy your library of favourites.

Since Thursday an update has been rolling out that allows users to sort through their Liked Songs by a variety of filters.

These filters include Genre and Mood but you will need to have liked at least 30 songs before the option becomes available.

This filter will be available on the Spotify app for Android and iOS and you can use the filters regardless of whether you are a Free or Premium subscriber.

As mentioned, the feature is currently rolling out but availability is limited to English-speaking regions. South Africa is explicitly named in this announcement but we’re yet to spot the feature on our handsets.

The genre and mood suggests can be found at the top of your Liked Songs library located in the Your Library section of the app.

This is the first time we’ve seen Spotify make use of a user’s favourite tracks rather than recommending music. While Spotify has an array of personalised playlists, many if not all of those playlists are generated through Spotify’s impressive algorithms.

This is a nice feature but it pales in comparison to an announcement made earlier this week.

Spotify HiFi will offer listeners high-fidelity, lossless audio streaming though it’s unclear whether South Africans will receive this feature.

While lossless audio is great, it’s not for everybody.

As much as we appreciate lossless audio, the fact of the matter is that unless you’re the type of person to check things like frequency response of speakers and the like, you’re probably not going to hear much of a difference between Spotify and Spotify HiFi.

With that having been said, if you want to know for certain if Spotify HiFi is for you, we recommend taking the ABX Blind Lossless Audio test.

Released when Tidal launched, this ABX test helps to give you an idea of whether you are able to tell a difference between a high quality audio file and a low quality one.

This test is best done with your best set of headphones, in a quiet room on a desktop computer or notebook.

We should also point out that the test will eat through 35MB of data at a minimum as you need to download uncompressed FLAC files.

The full test of 20 trials will take 15 – 30 minutes and it’s time well spent if you think Spotify HiFi is for you.

Brendyn Lotz

Brendyn Lotz

Brendyn Lotz writes news, reviews, and opinion pieces for Hypertext. His interests include SMEs, innovation on the African continent, cybersecurity, blockchain, games, geek culture and YouTube.

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