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Foldable iPhone reportedly slated for 2023 with 20 million shipped in first year

It is the start of the new month, which means we’re already behind on Apple-related news and iPhone rumour mongering. Instead of what will happen later this year, noted industry analyst Ming Chi-Kuo (who is normally spot on), has weighed in on the foldable iPhone.

To that end the foldable iPhone is expected to be revealed by Apple in 2023. Along with a launch window, Kuo also served up some specifications, but seeing as how there is no tangible evidence to work off of, they should be taking with a grain of salt.

With that in mind, the analyst says the foldable iPhone may feature an 8″ QHD+ flexible display. Apple is also planning to ship a substantial number of devices in the year that follows the unveiling, with up 20 million being eyed, if the report is to be believed.

“Based on Apple’s requested capacity plan, we predict that the foldable ‌iPhone‌ shipments will reach 15-20 million units in 2023. We expect that the foldable ‌iPhone‌ will adopt TPK’s silver nanowire touch solution because of its several advantages over SDC’s Y-Octa technology,” Kuo tells MacRumors.

That number is significant, and if true, will signal that Apple will try to make its foldable device the must-have mobile device of 2023 and 2024.

“We predict that foldable devices will blur the product segmentations between smartphones, tablets, and laptops in the future. With its cross-product ecosystems and hardware design advantages, Apple will be the biggest winner in the new foldable device trend,” Kuo boldly adds.

Whether Apple will indeed be the winner, remains to be seen, with Samsung, Huawei and others launching foldable phones with varying degrees of success.

With price, durability and form factor all being things for Apple to consider, it will be interesting to see whether it will be banking on hype alone, or whether it can produce a truly innovative device with the foldable iPhone in a couple of years, as it did with the original iPhone in 2007.

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